Policy and Advocacy

As India’s leading independent child rights organization, we advocate for better policies and practices to fulfill children’s rights and to ensure that children’s voices are heard at the national, state and local levels across thematic areas – Education, Child Protection, Health & Nutrition, Humanitarian, Poverty & Inclusion, and Resilience. ‘Being the voice of children’ is the underlying principle for all our child-centric advocacy initiatives that are intended to make a positive and sustainable change in the lives of millions of marginalized children in India.

Advocacy is central to ensuring lasting change in children’s lives and is also integral to our theory of change. Our advocacy encompasses research and policy analysis, lobbying, communications, and campaigning in all the thematic area that we work within.

Take a look at the biggest advocacy wins of Save the Children, India over the last 10 years.

Our Policy-level Achievements include:

  • Education

    Child protection

    • The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2013 along with a training module was drafted by Save the Children for police in Jammu and Kashmir.
    • Save the Children was recognized by the Ministry for Labour and Employment for its contribution to the Standard Operating Procedure for Enforcement of the Child and Adolescent (Prohibition and Regulation) Act, 1986, which was launched at a National Conference on Child Labour organized by Ministry of Labour and Employment on 26th September 2017; it recognizes Save the Children, India as one of the 3 NGOs that have contributed to this SOP and drafting of the rules after the amendment of the Act.
    • Save the Children was nominated by Ministry of Labour and Employment (MoL&E) to be a part of the Central Advisory Board (CAB) on Child and Adolescent Labour, where we were able to present technical input and evidence based advocacy requests on child labour. National Commission for the Protection of Child Rights adopted the e-learning module on Child Sexual Abuse & POCSO Act, 2012, which was developed as part of our programme intervention in Haryana & Punjab to create awareness on child safety.
    • Save the Children developed the Standard Operating Procedure for children in street situations with the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights.
      • Seven states have adopted and launched the Standard Operating Procedure for prevention, rescue, and restoration of children in street situations, which include Delhi, West Bengal, Telangana, Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Odisha, and Bihar.
      • Institutionalization of children in street situations (CiSS) interventions through formation of CiSS Steering Groups in Mumbai, Kolkata & Delhi.
    • Save the Children’s research mapped policies for children on the street, a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP), a first of its kind policy document that elaborates the process of care, protection, and restoration of children in street situations, was developed with Government body National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR). The SOP was launched on 21st February, 2017 by Smt. Maneka Gandhi – Ministry of Women and Child Development (MWCD), Stuti KackerChairperson NCPCR, and Dia Mirza – Artist Ambassador. A key component of the SOP is to provide every child with a legal identification document like the Aadhaar Card and to make the area postman and the post office a nodal link at a local level for street children. The SOP was launched in 7 states.
  • Health & Nutrition

    Child protection

    • The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2013 along with a training module was drafted by Save the Children for police in Jammu and Kashmir.
    • Save the Children was recognized by the Ministry for Labour and Employment for its contribution to the Standard Operating Procedure for Enforcement of the Child and Adolescent (Prohibition and Regulation) Act, 1986, which was launched at a National Conference on Child Labour organized by Ministry of Labour and Employment on 26th September 2017; it recognizes Save the Children, India as one of the 3 NGOs that have contributed to this SOP and drafting of the rules after the amendment of the Act.
    • Save the Children was nominated by Ministry of Labour and Employment (MoL&E) to be a part of the Central Advisory Board (CAB) on Child and Adolescent Labour, where we were able to present technical input and evidence based advocacy requests on child labour. National Commission for the Protection of Child Rights adopted the e-learning module on Child Sexual Abuse & POCSO Act, 2012, which was developed as part of our programme intervention in Haryana & Punjab to create awareness on child safety.
    • Save the Children developed the Standard Operating Procedure for children in street situations with the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights.
      • Seven states have adopted and launched the Standard Operating Procedure for prevention, rescue, and restoration of children in street situations, which include Delhi, West Bengal, Telangana, Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Odisha, and Bihar.
      • Institutionalization of children in street situations (CiSS) interventions through formation of CiSS Steering Groups in Mumbai, Kolkata & Delhi.
    • Save the Children’s research mapped policies for children on the street, a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP), a first of its kind policy document that elaborates the process of care, protection, and restoration of children in street situations, was developed with Government body National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR). The SOP was launched on 21st February, 2017 by Smt. Maneka Gandhi – Ministry of Women and Child Development (MWCD), Stuti KackerChairperson NCPCR, and Dia Mirza – Artist Ambassador. A key component of the SOP is to provide every child with a legal identification document like the Aadhaar Card and to make the area postman and the post office a nodal link at a local level for street children. The SOP was launched in 7 states.
  • Other achievements

    Child protection

    • The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2013 along with a training module was drafted by Save the Children for police in Jammu and Kashmir.
    • Save the Children was recognized by the Ministry for Labour and Employment for its contribution to the Standard Operating Procedure for Enforcement of the Child and Adolescent (Prohibition and Regulation) Act, 1986, which was launched at a National Conference on Child Labour organized by Ministry of Labour and Employment on 26th September 2017; it recognizes Save the Children, India as one of the 3 NGOs that have contributed to this SOP and drafting of the rules after the amendment of the Act.
    • Save the Children was nominated by Ministry of Labour and Employment (MoL&E) to be a part of the Central Advisory Board (CAB) on Child and Adolescent Labour, where we were able to present technical input and evidence based advocacy requests on child labour. National Commission for the Protection of Child Rights adopted the e-learning module on Child Sexual Abuse & POCSO Act, 2012, which was developed as part of our programme intervention in Haryana & Punjab to create awareness on child safety.
    • Save the Children developed the Standard Operating Procedure for children in street situations with the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights.
      • Seven states have adopted and launched the Standard Operating Procedure for prevention, rescue, and restoration of children in street situations, which include Delhi, West Bengal, Telangana, Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Odisha, and Bihar.
      • Institutionalization of children in street situations (CiSS) interventions through formation of CiSS Steering Groups in Mumbai, Kolkata & Delhi.
    • Save the Children’s research mapped policies for children on the street, a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP), a first of its kind policy document that elaborates the process of care, protection, and restoration of children in street situations, was developed with Government body National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR). The SOP was launched on 21st February, 2017 by Smt. Maneka Gandhi – Ministry of Women and Child Development (MWCD), Stuti KackerChairperson NCPCR, and Dia Mirza – Artist Ambassador. A key component of the SOP is to provide every child with a legal identification document like the Aadhaar Card and to make the area postman and the post office a nodal link at a local level for street children. The SOP was launched in 7 states.

Government bodies where Save the Children is considered a technical partner of choice includes:

  • Ministry of Women and Child Development

  • National Commission for Protection of Child Rights

  • Ministry of Health and Family Welfare

  • Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs

  • NITI Aayog

Policy wins for Save the Children April 2019 – March 2020

In 2019-2021, Save the Children’s policy and advocacy efforts will aim to influence and strengthen the policy environment around our strategic priorities.

In order to achieve our aim, our efforts will involve securing and leveraging the right partnerships to influence key policy changes for children.

  • 1. Ministry of Women and Child Development

    • Save the Children was able to secure public commitment on strengthening child protection systems and working with children’s groups which will support our efforts for Ending Violence Against Children from the newly appointed Minister of Women and Child Development – Smt. Smriti Zubin Irani at our national level centenary celebration The Right Start Summit.
    • Save the Children submitted a non-paper on the Juvenile Justice Act as requested by MWCD and two components discussed at the Group of Ministers (GoM) meeting on 21st February, 2020.
    • The GoM discussed both the issues raised on Juvenile Justice Act by Save the Children in the non-paper.
      • One of the key challenges in effective implementation of the Juvenile Justice Act, 2015 has been multiplicity and ambiguity amongst the monitoring authorities and that designating the DM as the ‘Administrator’ will enable her/him to review the aspects related to effective implementation of the JJ Act and Child Protection services.
      • There is also need for the Juvenile Justice Act to clearly highlight that offences in which juveniles are involved, which do not provide a minimum sentence of 7 years , cannot be treated as ‘heinous offences.
      • Click here to read the article published in Times of India
  • 2. National Commission of Protection for Child Rights (NCPCR)

    • Save the Children was able to secure public commitment on strengthening child protection systems and working with children’s groups which will support our efforts for Ending Violence Against Children from the newly appointed Minister of Women and Child Development – Smt. Smriti Zubin Irani at our national level centenary celebration The Right Start Summit.
    • Save the Children submitted a non-paper on the Juvenile Justice Act as requested by MWCD and two components discussed at the Group of Ministers (GoM) meeting on 21st February, 2020.
    • The GoM discussed both the issues raised on Juvenile Justice Act by Save the Children in the non-paper.
      • One of the key challenges in effective implementation of the Juvenile Justice Act, 2015 has been multiplicity and ambiguity amongst the monitoring authorities and that designating the DM as the ‘Administrator’ will enable her/him to review the aspects related to effective implementation of the JJ Act and Child Protection services.
      • There is also need for the Juvenile Justice Act to clearly highlight that offences in which juveniles are involved, which do not provide a minimum sentence of 7 years , cannot be treated as ‘heinous offences.
      • Click here to read the article published in Times of India
  • 3. Ministry of Human Resource and Development

    • Save the Children was able to secure public commitment on strengthening child protection systems and working with children’s groups which will support our efforts for Ending Violence Against Children from the newly appointed Minister of Women and Child Development – Smt. Smriti Zubin Irani at our national level centenary celebration The Right Start Summit.
    • Save the Children submitted a non-paper on the Juvenile Justice Act as requested by MWCD and two components discussed at the Group of Ministers (GoM) meeting on 21st February, 2020.
    • The GoM discussed both the issues raised on Juvenile Justice Act by Save the Children in the non-paper.
      • One of the key challenges in effective implementation of the Juvenile Justice Act, 2015 has been multiplicity and ambiguity amongst the monitoring authorities and that designating the DM as the ‘Administrator’ will enable her/him to review the aspects related to effective implementation of the JJ Act and Child Protection services.
      • There is also need for the Juvenile Justice Act to clearly highlight that offences in which juveniles are involved, which do not provide a minimum sentence of 7 years , cannot be treated as ‘heinous offences.
      • Click here to read the article published in Times of India
  • 4. Ministry of Human and Family Welfare

    • Save the Children was able to secure public commitment on strengthening child protection systems and working with children’s groups which will support our efforts for Ending Violence Against Children from the newly appointed Minister of Women and Child Development – Smt. Smriti Zubin Irani at our national level centenary celebration The Right Start Summit.
    • Save the Children submitted a non-paper on the Juvenile Justice Act as requested by MWCD and two components discussed at the Group of Ministers (GoM) meeting on 21st February, 2020.
    • The GoM discussed both the issues raised on Juvenile Justice Act by Save the Children in the non-paper.
      • One of the key challenges in effective implementation of the Juvenile Justice Act, 2015 has been multiplicity and ambiguity amongst the monitoring authorities and that designating the DM as the ‘Administrator’ will enable her/him to review the aspects related to effective implementation of the JJ Act and Child Protection services.
      • There is also need for the Juvenile Justice Act to clearly highlight that offences in which juveniles are involved, which do not provide a minimum sentence of 7 years , cannot be treated as ‘heinous offences.
      • Click here to read the article published in Times of India
  • 5. Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs

    • Save the Children was able to secure public commitment on strengthening child protection systems and working with children’s groups which will support our efforts for Ending Violence Against Children from the newly appointed Minister of Women and Child Development – Smt. Smriti Zubin Irani at our national level centenary celebration The Right Start Summit.
    • Save the Children submitted a non-paper on the Juvenile Justice Act as requested by MWCD and two components discussed at the Group of Ministers (GoM) meeting on 21st February, 2020.
    • The GoM discussed both the issues raised on Juvenile Justice Act by Save the Children in the non-paper.
      • One of the key challenges in effective implementation of the Juvenile Justice Act, 2015 has been multiplicity and ambiguity amongst the monitoring authorities and that designating the DM as the ‘Administrator’ will enable her/him to review the aspects related to effective implementation of the JJ Act and Child Protection services.
      • There is also need for the Juvenile Justice Act to clearly highlight that offences in which juveniles are involved, which do not provide a minimum sentence of 7 years , cannot be treated as ‘heinous offences.
      • Click here to read the article published in Times of India
  • 6. Ministry of Finance

    • Save the Children was able to secure public commitment on strengthening child protection systems and working with children’s groups which will support our efforts for Ending Violence Against Children from the newly appointed Minister of Women and Child Development – Smt. Smriti Zubin Irani at our national level centenary celebration The Right Start Summit.
    • Save the Children submitted a non-paper on the Juvenile Justice Act as requested by MWCD and two components discussed at the Group of Ministers (GoM) meeting on 21st February, 2020.
    • The GoM discussed both the issues raised on Juvenile Justice Act by Save the Children in the non-paper.
      • One of the key challenges in effective implementation of the Juvenile Justice Act, 2015 has been multiplicity and ambiguity amongst the monitoring authorities and that designating the DM as the ‘Administrator’ will enable her/him to review the aspects related to effective implementation of the JJ Act and Child Protection services.
      • There is also need for the Juvenile Justice Act to clearly highlight that offences in which juveniles are involved, which do not provide a minimum sentence of 7 years , cannot be treated as ‘heinous offences.
      • Click here to read the article published in Times of India
  • 7. National Institute of Public Cooperation and Child Development

    • Save the Children was able to secure public commitment on strengthening child protection systems and working with children’s groups which will support our efforts for Ending Violence Against Children from the newly appointed Minister of Women and Child Development – Smt. Smriti Zubin Irani at our national level centenary celebration The Right Start Summit.
    • Save the Children submitted a non-paper on the Juvenile Justice Act as requested by MWCD and two components discussed at the Group of Ministers (GoM) meeting on 21st February, 2020.
    • The GoM discussed both the issues raised on Juvenile Justice Act by Save the Children in the non-paper.
      • One of the key challenges in effective implementation of the Juvenile Justice Act, 2015 has been multiplicity and ambiguity amongst the monitoring authorities and that designating the DM as the ‘Administrator’ will enable her/him to review the aspects related to effective implementation of the JJ Act and Child Protection services.
      • There is also need for the Juvenile Justice Act to clearly highlight that offences in which juveniles are involved, which do not provide a minimum sentence of 7 years , cannot be treated as ‘heinous offences.
      • Click here to read the article published in Times of India
  • 8. NITI Aayog

    • Save the Children was able to secure public commitment on strengthening child protection systems and working with children’s groups which will support our efforts for Ending Violence Against Children from the newly appointed Minister of Women and Child Development – Smt. Smriti Zubin Irani at our national level centenary celebration The Right Start Summit.
    • Save the Children submitted a non-paper on the Juvenile Justice Act as requested by MWCD and two components discussed at the Group of Ministers (GoM) meeting on 21st February, 2020.
    • The GoM discussed both the issues raised on Juvenile Justice Act by Save the Children in the non-paper.
      • One of the key challenges in effective implementation of the Juvenile Justice Act, 2015 has been multiplicity and ambiguity amongst the monitoring authorities and that designating the DM as the ‘Administrator’ will enable her/him to review the aspects related to effective implementation of the JJ Act and Child Protection services.
      • There is also need for the Juvenile Justice Act to clearly highlight that offences in which juveniles are involved, which do not provide a minimum sentence of 7 years , cannot be treated as ‘heinous offences.
      • Click here to read the article published in Times of India

Save the Children also works to strengthen focus on child rights within Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

  • a. Save the Children co-leading children’s vertical for 2nd Voluntary National Review (VNR) process on child-centered SDGs (for HLPF 2020), initiated by NITI Aayog

    India will present its second Voluntary National Review (VNR) on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the UN High Level Political Forum(HLPF) 2020. NITI Aayog is coordinating the preparation of the VNR 2020. In order to ensure that the VNR 2020 adequately integrates CSOs’ perspectives, data and inputs, a series of national consultations with CSOs working with various vulnerable groups are being planned, under the aegis of NITI Aayog, in collaboration with United Nations India, Wada Na Todo Abhiyan (WNTA), and partner CSOs.

    Save the Children, in collaboration with Joining Forces for Children partners, Nine is Mine, CRY, and National Coalition for Education organised the National VNR Consultation on Children on Jan 16, 2020. The National Consultation was organized by child-focused agencies to review the progress of SDGs directly related to the rights of children and to suggest how children can be prioritized under the Leave No One Behind initiative.

    The report of the consultation will be part of the 2nd Voluntary National Review (VNR) chapter ‘Leave No One Behind’ for HLPF 2020.

  • b. Save the Children develops India Child Development Index

    India will present its second Voluntary National Review (VNR) on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the UN High Level Political Forum(HLPF) 2020. NITI Aayog is coordinating the preparation of the VNR 2020. In order to ensure that the VNR 2020 adequately integrates CSOs’ perspectives, data and inputs, a series of national consultations with CSOs working with various vulnerable groups are being planned, under the aegis of NITI Aayog, in collaboration with United Nations India, Wada Na Todo Abhiyan (WNTA), and partner CSOs.

    Save the Children, in collaboration with Joining Forces for Children partners, Nine is Mine, CRY, and National Coalition for Education organised the National VNR Consultation on Children on Jan 16, 2020. The National Consultation was organized by child-focused agencies to review the progress of SDGs directly related to the rights of children and to suggest how children can be prioritized under the Leave No One Behind initiative.

    The report of the consultation will be part of the 2nd Voluntary National Review (VNR) chapter ‘Leave No One Behind’ for HLPF 2020.

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