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Promoting Child Rights in Spice Growing 30 Villages of Guntur, Andhra Pradesh

Promoting Child Rights in Spice Growing 30 Villages of Guntur, Andhra Pradesh

3.8 million children in India work as child labourers, often involved in hazardous jobs. The recent amendments in the Child Labour Prohibition and Regulation Act (CLPRA) allows child labour in “family or family enterprises”. This is likely to increase the involvement of children in agriculture because it is usually a family enterprise. This will now cause hindrance in letting children experience a happy and safe childhood.

Production of spices comprises an important part of India’s agricultural sector as India is the largest producer, consumer and exporter of spices. 69.5 percent of child labour (5-14 age) in India works in the agricultural sector (according to a 2013 report titled ‘Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labour’ by the US Department of Labour).

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Over 6 lakh benefit from Save the Children-Nokia Technology intervention on Disaster Risk Reduction

Over 6 lakh benefit from Save the Children-Nokia Technology intervention on Disaster Risk Reduction

 -7000 task force members trained to build resilience during emergencies
 

14 March, New Delhi: Save the Children, in partnership with NOKIA Solutions India Pvt. Ltd, has benefitted over 6 lakh people, including 2.5 lakh children through their ‘Building Resilience of Children and their Communities’ project. The 3-level integrated intervention of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), Child Sensitive Social Protection (CSSP) and Information Technology, across 350 villages, capacitated communities affected by developmental and weather related risks.

The project supported schools and communities in Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Delhi, Rajasthan and Tamil Nadu towards making them resilient, while also empowering them to access and sustain a dignified life.

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Stop Diarrhoea Project demonstrates 62% reduction in point prevalence of diarrhoea

Stop Diarrhoea Project demonstrates 62% reduction in point prevalence of diarrhoea

Save the Children’s Stop Diarrhoea Initiative averts 16,286 cases of diarrhoea; reduces diarrhoeal deaths by 15%

New Delhi: The integrated implementation of 7-point plan for Diarrhoeal Control and Prevention, under Save the Children’s Stop Diarrhoea Initiative (SDI), has successfully demonstrated 62 percent reduction in prevalence of diarrhoea in the intervention areas as per the baseline survey and end line survey conducted in 2014 and 2018 respectively. The integrated implementation of 7-point plan for diarrhoea control and prevention has 21% more reduction of diarrhoea prevalence than the control area. Further, based on the calculation estimates, the SDI programme has been successful in averting about 16000 cases of diarrhoea in the intervention area and an estimated reduction in mortality due to the disease lowered by 15%.

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Musings from Our CEO: Bidisha Pillai’s Visit to Assam

Musings from Our CEO: Bidisha Pillai’s Visit to Assam

Save the Children’s CEO- Bidisha Pillai travelled to Assam and shared some reflections from the field. According to Bidisha, the work that we are doing in Dibrugarh, with small tea growers focusing on sustainable business practices, ensuring fair wages for labourers (especially women) and protecting the rights of children in the tea gardens, is incredibly important, and potentially game-changing. There are many issues there, which include the fact that basic services like schools, Anganwadi centres, and hospitals are not always available to these marginalised communities, and even if they are, then the quality of services provided leaves much to be desired.

The main issue with the small tea growers that appeared to leap out, was income poverty: because of the poor margins that they generate from the tea production, they are unable to pay minimum wages to the labourers, which leads to problems like school dropouts, child labour, and early marriage. There was a discussion about the need for more in-depth data to improve our understanding of these issues.

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Meet Team India: All Set for Making a Mark at Street Child Cricket World Cup 2019

Meet Team India: All Set for Making a Mark at Street Child Cricket World Cup 2019

Soni Khatoon: 15-year-old Soni lives with her family in the EJC Durgapur Dock Junction area of Kolkata. This area is primarily like a garage for trucks. Her family comprises of her father, mother, and her elder brother. Her parents admitted their elder son in an English medium school but they denied Soni access to quality education.

Ayushman: 14-year-old Ayushman lives in a slum tugged in the outskirts of Kolkata. His family comprises his father, mother, and three siblings. He is the youngest among all the siblings. Ayushman’s father moved to Kolkata in 1979 and worked at a tea producing company for around 25 years until the company shut down in 1995. Currently, he is working as the President of the EJC Durgapur Basti Committee. Ayushman’s life have been replete with struggles and obstacles.

Lusi Sharma: 13-year-old Lusi belongs to an extremely poverty-stricken family of Kolkata. She lives with her father, mother and five siblings. Her father is a carpenter and mother is a housewife. Currently, Lusi and all her siblings go to school. But because of the financial constraints their family is facing, Lusi might have to drop out of school.

Md. Waris: Md. Waris is a 12-year-old cheerful boy residing in the slums of Broad Street, Kolkata. His family comprises his father, mother, and three sisters. His family has been trying to battle poverty and make ends meet for a long time. His father is a rickshaw driver and mother is working as a domestic help in a house.

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